GraphicsDev_RadeonSDK_1140x100
Welcome to AMD’s Radeon™ Software Developer’s Kit (SDK) page. These samples are intended to provide developers with the inside scoop on getting the most out of AMD’s latest products using Microsoft® DirectX® for 3D graphics. Descriptions of each sample can be found below, as well as helpful documentation about optimization, hardware features and more. Download all current samples from the download table below. For older Radeon™ SDK samples, utilities and documentation, please visit the Archive SDK page.

What’s new (August 2014)

  • New SDK sample: GPUParticles
  • New SDK sample: SilhouetteTessellation
  • TressFX version 2.2 sample with new features including simulation performance improvements
  • ForwardPlus version 1.1: fixed bug causing visual differences when culling was enabled with a high number of lights
  • DepthBoundsTest version 1.1: fixed bug with enabling MSAA causing a black screen
  • All DirectX 11 SDK samples were updated to reference the Windows 8 or 8.1. software development kits
  • Legacy SDK samples moved to archive page

 

 Prerequesites for building all SDK samples -
1) A PC with at least 4 GB of memory and an AMD graphics card with installed drivers;
2) A 64-bit Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 8.1 operating system;
3) The Windows 8 or Windows 8.1 Software Development Kit must be installed.

Direct3D 11 Samples

TressFX11 v2.2

TressFXv2.2_ThumbnailThe TressFX11 sample shows how to use AMD’s TressFX hair rendering technology for rendering and simulating hair. TressFX uses volumetric self shadowing, transparency, and antialiasing to render individual strands of realistic looking hair. It also uses the GPU to accelerate the physics simulation of each hair. Version 2.2 changes: simulation performance improvements, binary format for faster loading, ability to render multiple hair models in the same frame, added “warp” feature to simulation, new model (Ruby). (August 2014) Go to download table.

TiledLighting11 v1.2

This sample provides an example implementation of two tile-based light culling methods: Forward+ and Tiled Deferred. Both methods support high numbers of dynamic lights while maintaining performance. They use DirectCompute to divide the screen into tiles and quickly cull lights against those tiles. In addition to standard point and spot lights, this sample supports shadow-casting lights. It also extends tiled light culling to work with alpha-blended geometry. Finally, virtual point lights (VPLs) can be spawned to approximate one-bounce global illumination, as seen in AMD’s Leo Demo. Version 1.1 includes updated documentation. Catalyst drivers 13.9 or later include a profile for this SDK sample to ensure MSAA performance is optimal. (August 2014) Go to download table.

DepthBoundsTest11 v1.1

The DepthBoundsTest11 sample shows how to use the AMD Depth Bounds Test extension, a feature of the AMD GCN architecture, to limit rendering within a specified depth bounds. By limiting what pixels are rendered, some graphics techniques can run faster because fewer pixels need to be rendered, and therefore fewer instructions executed by pixel shaders. (August 2014) Go to download table.

SuperSample Anti-Aliasing11 v1.1

This sample demonstrates some of the ways in which to reduce aliasing without using a post process technique. Methods include antialiasing (MSAA), supersample antialiasing (SSAA) and enhanced quality antialiasing (EQAA). (August 2014) Go to download table.

 ForwardPlus11 v1.1

The ForwardPlus11 v1.1 sample provides an example implementation of the Forward+ algorithm, which extends traditional forward rendering to support high numbers of dynamic lights while maintaining performance. It utilizes a Direct3D 11 compute shader (DirectCompute 5.0) to divide the screen into tiles and quickly cull lights against those tiles, resulting in per-tile light lists for the forward pixel shader. (August 2014) Go to download table.

 

 Morphological Anti-Aliasing11 v2.1

This sample demonstrates a post-process pixel shader technique that applies Fullscreen Anti-Aliasing to an image. Morphological Antialiasing (MLAA) was originally developed by Intel Lab but was designed for a CPU based post-process. This sample demonstrates a modified MLAA implementation adapted to run on the GPU. This update includes a further optimization which uses the stencil buffer to mask edges, and therefore reduce the workload for second stage of the effect. (August 2014) Go to download table.

 

 SeparableFilter11 v1.4

This sample, presents a technique for achieving highly optimized user defined separable filters. It utilizes Direct3D 11 APIs and hardware to make use of DirectCompute11 to greatly accelerate this common post processing technique. Included in the sample are implementations for the classic Gaussian filter, and also a fairly simple bilateral filter, but the shader and source code have been setup to allow the user to add their own different filters, with the minimum of fuss.The application implements both a Compute Shader and Pixel Shader path, so that the performance gains achieved through using DirectCompute11can be measured. (August 2014) Go to download table.

 

 SilhouetteTessellation v1.0

SilhouetteTessellationv1.0_thumbnailThis SDK sample shows how to perform view-dependent and adaptive tessellation in two well-known techniques: PN (Point-Normal) Triangles and Phong tessellation. The techniques included in this sample ensures that tessellation is done efficiently by only tessellating where and when required. (August 2014) Go to download table.

 

GPUParticles v1.0

GPUParticlesv1.0_thumbnailThis sample demonstrates how to implement a simple GPU-based particle system. It also  shows how to perform depth buffer collisions as well as sorting the particles on the GPU for correct blending of rasterized billboards. The sample also shows an alternative technique to rasterization that leverages DirectCompute to render the particles in tiles in a compute shader. (August 2014) Go to download table.


Documentation

 GCN Performance Tweets

This document lists all GCN (“Graphics Core Next”) performance tweets that were released on Twitter during the first few months of 2013. Each performance tweet in this document is accompanied by additional details to complete the information provided on Twitter. (May 2013)

 EQAA Modes for AMD 6900 Series Graphics Cards

Enhanced Quality Anti-Aliasing (EQAA) is a new anti-aliasing technology available from the AMD HD 6900 series of graphics cards onwards. This new Anti-Aliasing (AA) technology offers advanced smoothing of aliased edges without requiring additional video memory, and with a minimal performance cost. This document explains how to implement EQAA support in graphic applications. (September 2011)
While this document details the EQAA modes first made available on AMD 6900 Series it is also applicable on all AMD GPUs released since.

 Advanced DX9 Capabilities for ATI Radeon Cards

This white paper gives implementation details on some of the advanced capabilities exposed by Radeon graphic drivers under the DirectX 9 API. Those capabilities target a feature level not directly exposed by DirectX 9, and therefore require an additional programming interface to take advantage of them. (July 2009)

 ATI Radeon HD 2000 Programming Guide

This paper discusses general optimization hints and best practices for programming the latest ATI Radeon HD 2000 series hardware. It covers topics such as shaders, texturing, z optimizations, D3D10 optimizations etc.  (June 2007)
Note that most practices mentioned in this document also apply to AMD GPUs recently released.

 Depth In-depth

This paper goes through the Z optimizations in current and earlier hardware. It explains the technical details behind techniques such as Hierarchical-Z and Early-Z and discusses the how to best utilizing these hardware optimizations. (June 2007)
Note that a good amount of information mentioned in this document also apply to AMD GPUs recently released.

 Resolve your Resolves

This white paper discusses the performance and quality implications of using MSAA Resolves in the rendering pipeline. Many MSAA Resolves are either redundant or harmful to image quality, and this paper highlights the common pitfalls and presents the recommend course of action to get it right. (Aug 2008)
All recommendations in this document also apply to AMD GPUs recently released.

 

 

 

Downloads

File Name Version Size Launch Date OS Bitness Description

File Name

Version

2.2

Size

83.6 MB

Launch Date

August 2014

OS

Windows 7, Windows 8

Bitness

64-bit

Description

The TressFX11 sample shows how to use AMD's TressFX hair technology for simulating and rendering hair. TressFX uses volumetric self-shadowing, transparency and antialiasing to render hair strands.

File Name

Version

1.2

Size

72.8 MB

Launch Date

August 2014

OS

Windows 7, Windows 8

Bitness

64-bit

Description

The Tiled Lighting sample provides an example implementation of two tile-based light culling methods: Forward+ and Tiled Deferred.

File Name

Version

1.1

Size

22.2MB

Launch Date

August 2014

OS

Windows 7, Windows 8

Bitness

64-bit

Description

The Depth Bounds Test sample illustrates how AMD Depth Bounds Test extension can be used to limit rendering within a specified depth bounds.

File Name

Version

1.1

Size

34.6 MB

Launch Date

August 2014

OS

Windows 7, WIndows 8

Bitness

64-bit

Description

Demonstrates different fullscreen anti-aliasing methods including Supersample Anti-Aliasing and EQAA.

File Name

Version

1.1

Size

62.3 MB

Launch Date

August 2014

OS

Windows 7, Windows 8

Bitness

64-bit

Description

Provides an example implementation of the Forward+ algorithm, which supports high numbers of dynamic lights while maintaining performance.

File Name

Version

2.1

Size

24.7 MB

Launch Date

August 2014

OS

Windows 7, Windows 8

Bitness

64-bit

Description

This sample demonstrates a post-process pixel shader technique that applies Fullscreen Anti-Aliasing to an image.

File Name

Version

1.4

Size

35.6 MB

Launch Date

August 2014

OS

Windows 7, Windows 8

Bitness

64-bit

Description

The Separable Filter sample presents a highly optimized DirectCompute technique for achieving user defined separable filters.

File Name

Version

1.0

Size

5.2 MB

Launch Date

August 2014

OS

Windows 7, Windows 8

Bitness

64-bit

Description

Demonstrates the use of DirectX 11 tessellation to improve the curvature of objects at close range. A number of adaptive techniques are provided to improve performance while maintaining the quality of visuals.

File Name

Version

1.0

Size

19,5 MB

Launch Date

August 2014

OS

Windows 7, Windows 8

Bitness

64-bit

Description

This sample shows how DirectCompute can be used to accelerate the simulation, sorting and rendering of particles by splitting the screen into tiles that are then processed in a compute shader.